I saw the clip of Michael Bay trying to “wing it” on stage at the recent CES launch of the Samsung 105″ curved TV screen and really felt for him as the autocue stopped working, or perhaps never even started working.

What was more interesting to me was to note his “state” as he came onto stage and started talking, watch the movie below muted first of all and notice his non-verbal body language even before he starts talking:

 

 

0:11 – Michael comes on stage, already “hand wringing” and “clasping”, clearly looking uncomfortable to be there – from the outside it already looks like his state is not right, before he even starts speaking.
0:45 – After a brief conversation about the product; Michael admits that the autocue is not working and says he’s just going to wing it, the host starts asking questions about the screen again.
1:11 – Michael clearly is in overwhelm mode and decides to leave the stage saying “he’s sorry”.
1:25 – Clearly slightly thrown himself, the host loses his composure (notice the clasped hands) and then regains it again within a few seconds, choosing to close that section of the show early!

Now watch it again with the sound on and notice what else you pickup from the language of both Michael and the host.

What’s really interesting is that whilst the host clearly isnt expecting this to happen, he’s able to regain his composure within a few seconds and keep going on with the show.

Afterwards Michael posted:

Wow! I just embarrassed myself at CES – I was about to speak for Samsung for this awesome Curved 105-inch UHD TV. I rarely lend my name to any products, but this one is just stellar. I got so excited to talk, that I skipped over the Exec VP’s intro line and then the teleprompter got lost. Then the prompter went up and down – then I walked off. I guess live shows aren’t my thing.

Now obviously preparation is a must (as is keeping pace with the autocue) before any stage appearance, whether it’s for 20 or 2,000 people and even more important is your state of mind, so that even when something unexpected happens you’re able to deal with it.

Technology is a wonderful thing when it works and a real pain when it doesn’t which is why always having a Plan B is good, we’ve had stereos that haven’t worked or leads which have broken or we’ve  turned up for an in-house workshop to find that they’ve forgotten the screen and projector!

However, if you keep your state calm and know your content, you can still deliver an engaging and productive presentation/workshop without the need for the anything other than yourself!

We run a “How to enjoy presenting” workshop in which we focus on how to feel confident before you walk on stage, as when you are confident walking in front of your audience the rest will just flow.

We’ve been working with a lovely lady called Julia who first attended the How to enjoy presenting workshop last year and who has subsequently been on our NLP Practitioner for Healthcare training, she sent us a lovely letter this week, an extract of which is below:

I had some amazing feedback for you on Friday, Apparently at a meeting with the Head of Nursing & Service in Kent a discussion followed about presentations at the celebration of excellence conference – the comment was made that the “active baby” presentation was the most polished and professional and should be held as a benchmark for others to aim for!!! How’s that for progress from a quaking wreck to the best of the bunch!  Julia – Project Lead for active learner project

So if we can help you; or anyone else like Michael who faces the audience as a quaking wreck and show you how you too can become the best of the bunch, come and join us on the 22nd February or the 20th June in London for our How to enjoy presenting and talking to large groups workshop.

It really is as easy as a click of your fingers!

Andy